Controlled Flying Scissors Takedown

In a real self-defense situation a simple modification of the way this technique is executed can increase the chances that this takedown will be effective.The flying scissors takedown is found in many martial arts systems including karate, many Kung Fu systems and jujutsu. At one time it was also part of judo, known as Kani-basami, but due to many injuries it was banned as a throw.

The technique -- in which you jump up and use your legs as a scissor, one across the chest, the other behind the knees, to take down an opponent -- can take an opponent by surprise, and take him to the ground quite effectively.
 

The technique -- in which you jump up and use your legs as a scissor, one across the chest, the other behind the knees, to take down an opponent -- can take an opponent by surprise, and take him to the ground quite effectively. But there can be problems. If the opponent isn’t trained in falling, often the head will impact the

floor or other surface.​

This technique is most often performed by quickly launching the body into the air to attempt to entangle and take down the opponent with the scissor action of the legs across the body and legs. But, if execution is poor the technique just might not work if the opponent is in a strong, balanced stance. The defender is then vulnerable to counterattack.

If poor execution results in a leg scissor attempt that is applied too low on the opponent’s body, one heel of the foot can hit into an opponent’s groin. While perhaps effective as self-defense, this outcome is not a good one if you want to keep a good relationship with your training partner.

Likewise, if the defender is smaller and lighter than the opponent, the scissor takedown even if well executed might not work. In some cases the defender’s legs just slap hard around the opponent, but then the body often just slides off.

Even if the defender is successful using this technique, upon taking down the opponent, the defender is confronted with another problem. His leg has become trapped under the attacker’s leg.

There is a simple way to insure more control in this technique, however. A simple modification will allow for simpler, more controlled takedowns. There are also several alternatives you can exercise on the attacker after the throw has been completed.